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Can a MacBook air catch viruses? ?

Can a MacBook air catch viruses? ?

Postby rollo » Mon May 23, 2011 10:11 am

I've heard that the MacBooks have a virus protection program, but i wasn't sure.
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Can a MacBook air catch viruses? ?

Postby fergal1 » Mon May 23, 2011 10:15 am

you bet you buttox they can
all computational devices are subject to viruses
macs are less protected but less targeted by hackers because less people use them for important work related purposes ( like cisco mostly uses pc's because of there processing power that macs just dont have)
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Can a MacBook air catch viruses? ?

Postby ocunnowhurst96 » Mon May 23, 2011 10:24 am

They can, but I wouldn't really worry about it.

Fact: Macs are more insecure than Windows PCs, and always fall first at hacking contests.
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Can a MacBook air catch viruses? ?

Postby conlin » Mon May 23, 2011 10:29 am

They can, but I wouldn't really worry about it.

Fact: Macs are more insecure than Windows PCs, and always fall first at hacking contests.
All computers can get viruses, even if they have anti-virus programs installed.
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Can a MacBook air catch viruses? ?

Postby nyles77 » Mon May 23, 2011 10:34 am

They can, but I wouldn't really worry about it.

Fact: Macs are more insecure than Windows PCs, and always fall first at hacking contests.
All computers can get viruses, even if they have anti-virus programs installed.
It's very simple. If it's connected to the internet, it's vulnerable to attack. Doesn't matter what brand it is.
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Can a MacBook air catch viruses? ?

Postby gregg » Mon May 23, 2011 10:38 am

No Apple computer comes with any anti-virus software and none ever has. There has never been any OS X virus, so that makes it pretty difficult for a Mac to get one. If you install Windows on your Mac, it can get the thousands of Windows viruses.

Now for the definitions:
virus: app that attaches itself to another app and can self-replicate.
worm: app that is unattached, self-replicating, self-sending (via network or attached disk).
Trojan horse: app that appears to be desirable, but is not.

These definitions are not necessarily independent of each other. Trojan horses may or may not replicate and may or may not have a mechanism of spreading themselves. An executable file ("executable" means it can run) may be a Trojan horse that can self-replicate, attach to another application, and spread by networking. This would make it all three. A virus may or may not contain code to distribute or spread itself.

There have been a few worms and Trojans for OS X a few years ago, but none are currently in circulation. The design of the UNIX base system (as well as any UNIX-like system, such as Linux) prevents uninvited invasion by any virus. The only way an app can get installed in OS X is if you type your password when it tries to install and asks you for your password, and again when it tries to attach itself to another app and asks you for your password. Same goes for worms and Trojans. People have been fooled by a couple of OS X Trojans and thought they were getting something good, so they typed their passwords.

You can safely ignore the parrot claims of "Macs always fall first at hacking contests" because they are contests to see who is the best hacker, not to see which is the most vulnerable computer. The last contest was won by a team from a French security company. In France, Mac is about five times as popular as in the U.S., so this team were experts at Macs. Who better than they to win a hacking contest? f that team of hackers decide to hack through your personal Mac, they have a better chance at it than anyone else... well, not a great chance, because one of the goals of the contest was to share the security issues with Apple and Microsoft, so the security hole in Safari and Internet Explorer was patched right away. It just proves that the Mac nerds were smarter than the Windows nerds. It took SEVERAL MINUTES LONGER for the Windows computer to be hacked. Aha! Windows is minutes safer than a Mac when attacked by a team of experts from a security company who spend their entire careers studying how to hack computers. All you Windows users can relax for several minutes.

A virus is not a hacker. It is just an app designed to invade, replicate, and attach. They do that quite effectively every minute of every day to Windows. They do not do it to OS X.
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